A Japanese House With Deep Ties to Modernism Gets a New Day in the Sun

Shofuso, a 17th-century-style home that was designed by among Japans many well-known designers, Junzō Yoshimura, was built in 1953. It became one of the most influential Japanese homes of the postwar generation. A present from Japan to the United States, it was brought to New York as part of “The House in the Museum Garden” series at the Museum of Modern Art, and was later on moved to Philadelphias West Fairmount Park. Today, it opens its real and virtual doors today as part of a brand-new exhibition, “Shofuso and Modernism,” which is organized by the Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia and is set to run through December.The story of Yoshimura, Japanese-American furniture designer George Nakashima, and their mentors, European American designers and designers Antonin and Noémi Raymond, serve as the nucleus behind the brand-new displays narrative. Curated by Yuka Yokoyama and William Whitaker, the program includes styles, renderings, furnishings, and individual products that spotlight transcultural collaborations. Yoshimura developed Shofuso in the shoin design. Like his coach, Antonin Raymond, he liked to borrow from Japanese traditions but impart his style with a more modern sensibility. “The word shoin actually indicates a built-in desk,” Yokoyama informs ADVERTISEMENT PRO. “Theres an area of the home where the Japanese sit on the floor, on tatami mats: a research study desk becomes part of the architecture.” Shofuso ended up being a turning point in the architectural profession of Yoshimura. Upon finishing your home, he created private homes for the Rockefeller family along with the Japan Society structure in New York. “All these houses featured a garden the majority of the time,” says Yokoyama, who noted that Yoshimura had a philosophical way of seeing architecture; his dream was not to develop the highest high-rise building in Manhattan however to provide a more practical, harmonious cohabitation with the house and nature.When guests visit this house, they will discover it difficult to overlook the serene garden with waterfall, initially created by Tansai Sano. “The garden was designed to be seen from the within,” states Yokoyama, describing the floor-to-ceiling windows and moving doors that make you feel totally at one with the outdoors. In this Japanese house, the relationship in between nature and the architecture is very crucial. The architecture is a tool to see nature.” The interior of George Nakashima Woodworkers.
Image: Elizabeth FeliceliaBecome an AD PRO MemberBuy now for endless access and all of the advantages that only members get to experience.ArrowIn by doing this, Shofuso is somewhat similar to much of the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. Fittingly, as part of the exhibition, visitors will see Antonin Raymonds drawings of Japanese artisans that he made while dealing with Wright on the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo; as well as wooden chairs that the Raymonds carried out in collaboration with Nakashima..

A present from Japan to the United States, it was brought to New York as part of “The House in the Museum Garden” series at the Museum of Modern Art, and was later moved to Philadelphias West Fairmount Park. Upon completing the house, he designed private houses for the Rockefeller household as well as the Japan Society building in New York. “All these homes came with a garden many of the time,” states Yokoyama, who noted that Yoshimura had a philosophical way of seeing architecture; his dream was not to develop the highest skyscraper in Manhattan but to provide a more functional, unified cohabitation with the home and nature.When visitors visit this house, they will discover it hard to neglect the serene garden with waterfall, initially designed by Tansai Sano.