A New Garden Grows Within an Iconic New York City Building

Hollander– an AD100 Top Designer who is understood for work at Washington, D.C.s John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and for producing unique oases for magnates like Jonathan Tisch, William Rudin, and Lloyd Blankfein– said that in spite of the restrictions on landmarks, his firm was still able to offer the Gilded Age slab a dosage of much-needed updating.To do so, Hollanders team removed the space down to the “roofing” level, and then thoroughly restored every element– all the way to re-gilding the faded lamp components. They then set up granite paving with ornamental inlays and bandings that reference initial planting beds and the buildings bluestone base.All of these jobs were challenging, however Hollander states selecting plants for an environment with different light conditions and restrictive air flow like the Belnords courtyard proved especially tricky.A rendering of the brand-new yard as it was being created by Hollander.
Rendering courtesy of Hollander Design” I studied cultivation at the New York Botanical Garden,” Hollander says.

Hollander– an AD100 Top Designer who is known for work at Washington, D.C.s John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and for developing exclusive oases for moguls like Jonathan Tisch, William Rudin, and Lloyd Blankfein– stated that regardless of the limitations on landmarks, his company was still able to give the Gilded Age piece a dosage of much-needed updating.To do so, Hollanders team removed the space down to the “roofing” level, and then thoroughly restored every element– all the method to re-gilding the faded light components. They then set up granite paving with decorative inlays and bandings that reference original planting beds and the buildings bluestone base.All of these tasks were challenging, however Hollander says selecting plants for an environment with diverse light conditions and restrictive airflow like the Belnords courtyard showed particularly tricky.A making of the brand-new courtyard as it was being developed by Hollander.
Rendering courtesy of Hollander Design” I studied gardening at the New York Botanical Garden,” Hollander states.” Hollanders option was to find plants that “provided four-season interest” like Redpointe Maple trees, boxwoods, hollies, hydrangeas, rhododendrons, azaleas, and hellebore, which flower in January. The result: a garden yard that looks extremely much like it did in the early 20th century.For RAMSA– who recently debuted another brand-new architecturally significant Manhattan project across Central Park on the Upper East Side– partnering with Hollander was an exercise in both charm and functionality.
Hollander says this has less to do with landmark restrictions and more to do with his propensity for customizing designs to fit the needs of a particular task. “Our approach is do no harm,” Hollander describes.