Daniel Boulud and Stephanie Goto Unveil a Striking Indoor-Dining Concept

The lounge leading into the restaurant features blue tones and a Stark Carpet catwalk.
Image: Thomas SchauerHere, woven, durable fabric by Dedar, remembering the sea and sky, graduates from dark to light blue. A Stark Carpet runner acts as a catwalk, leading guests across the promenade and into the dining space, called the Salon Vert. Or, “my 3D sculptural version of a window to the sky,” as Goto informs AD PRO.
Picture: Thomas SchauerAll of the classical arches that line Daniel are now filled with breezy, mint-hued Hermès Feuillage wallpaper. Through the open gaps, looks of the initial restaurant– last fixed up by Adam D. Tihany in 2008– are visible, giving Boulud Sur Mer the feel of a phase set. “We are not removing the history, however for a little while screening it so you have this dialogue in between that history and the temporal,” as Goto puts it.To satisfy the necessary 25% capability on dining rooms, tables, with recycled plastic chairs by Emeco, are sparsely set up. A mix of plant– kentia palms, and banana leaf and xanadu plants– are “almost like sculptures,” and have fun with the height of the space while “contributing to the layering of personal privacy thats needed,” states Goto. “We tried to make it as theatrical as possible.” Goto developed the logo and menu graphics also, and even equipped the personnel in Uniqlo pants and a Comme des Garçons t-shirt that riffs on the conventional French sailor stripe, looping every information in a holistic way. Currently, Boulud Sur Mer is slated to remain open until November 30. Till then there is another soon-to-be-revealed layer to look forward to: geranium-clad cottages crafted from Perennials Fabrics for those who choose to consume alfresco. “They have actually an inclined roofing line, so when you drive by you [get] this distinctive graphic practically,” states Goto. “We are taking the idea of being on the beach and providing it metropolitan context.”

A Stark Carpet runner acts as a catwalk, leading visitors across the promenade and into the dining room, called the Salon Vert. “We are not getting rid of the history, but for a moment screening it so you have this dialogue between that history and the temporal,” as Goto puts it.To fulfill the compulsory 25% capability on dining rooms, tables, with recycled plastic chairs by Emeco, are sparsely installed. A mix of plant– kentia palms, and banana leaf and xanadu plants– are “nearly like sculptures,” and play with the height of the room while “adding to the layering of personal privacy thats needed,” states Goto.