Via Maris is Judaica for the 21st Century

“If anything, I know too much about how tough it is to have brands,” she says.An unproductive search for a beautiful mezuzah– a little things mounted to the doorways of Jewish homes containing verses from the Torah– and numerous discussions with pals who d had likewise frustrating experiences going shopping for Judaica that matched their love of modern style (editors note: SAME) led her to reconsider: “When I had this concept, I felt so strongly that it required to exist and was kind of like, Im going to take one for the team.”Anyone who has struggled to shop for mezuzahs, menorahs, or any other item under the Judaica umbrella has most likely experienced a sea of so-so designs, with a few recent exceptions.”We just got to focus on what item style is about,” Schwartz said.The mezuzah, for example, can be installed with hidden screws or a command strip, versus unappealing basic screws that typically interrupt a mezuzahs design.
Image courtesy of Via MarisPerhaps the most interesting innovation for someone who matured fearing the family task of scraping persistent candle wax off ornately embellished candleholders throughout the vacations every year: Next month Via Maris introduces what Schwartz calls “low-drip, low-smoke” candles. In Jewish tradition its custom to never ever blow candle lights out, so the team established another design hack to lower the burn time of the candles.The Rest Candleholder is available in 4 colorways and Schwartz encourages usage on any day of the week. Image thanks to Via MarisThe low-drip, low-smoke candle lights were the hardest items in the collection to establish, Schwartz said.Image thanks to Via MarisAnother notable function of the designs is that they eschew significance and traditional concepts. “We desired it to feel modern and truly fresh in regards to how individuals could pick to connect with those items,” she said.And shes not stopping here. The second collection, coming this winter season, will cover the next frontier on the Jewish calendar, and another realm of Judaica that might definitely use an update: the Passover tablescape.

“If anything, I understand too much about how difficult it is to have brands,” she says.An useless search for a great-looking mezuzah– a small object mounted to the doorways of Jewish houses containing verses from the Torah– and several discussions with friends who had actually had similarly disappointing experiences shopping for Judaica that matched their love of modern design (editors note: SAME) led her to reconsider: “When I had this idea, I felt so strongly that it required to exist and was kind of like, Im going to take one for the team.”Anyone who has struggled to shop for mezuzahs, menorahs, or any other item under the Judaica umbrella has most likely experienced a sea of so-so styles, with a couple of current exceptions.”We simply got to focus on what product style is about,” Schwartz said.The mezuzah, for example, can be set up with concealed screws or a command strip, versus unappealing basic screws that generally interrupt a mezuzahs style.